Royal crown derby marks dating

It was known as 'Derby Porcelain' until 1773, when it became 'Crown Derby', the 'Royal' being added in 1890.

The factory closed down in the past under Royal Doulton ownership, but production was revived under the renewed ownership of Hugh Gibson and Pearson family.

After settling in england, planche decided to open a porcelain factory.

He partnered with William Duesbury (a wealthy English merchant) and the two men began work on a factory in Derby. Proximity to the river allowed Duesbury and Planche to easily import and export raw materials as well as export the finished product.

This was the foundation of the Derby company, although production at the works at Cockpit Hill, just outside the town, had begun before then, as evidenced by a creamware jug dated 1750, also in the possession of the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Planché disappeared from the scene almost at once, and the business was developed by Duesbury and Heath, and later Duesbury alone.

The Royal Crown Derby porcelain company is a privately owned limited company.

Curiously, there are no other references to this supposed Derby Porcelain Manufactory, which suggests that the name was specifically invented for the occasion.

No mechanical processes were used and no two pieces produced were exactly the same.

Among the items preserved was the original potters wheel used by the Duesburys.

This took the form of a small graphic illustration below the main mark and later, from 1938, a Roman numeral.

The V of 1904 can be confused with the Roman V of 1942 as can the X for 1901 and the Roman X for 1947.